stat tracker for tumblr
Prolonged Eye Contact
dailymurf:

petitesurrealiste:

strangerthanheartbreak:

Another reason to avoid marrying men.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
everything about this makes me sick.  yes, go marry your daddy, because clearly you still belong to him and I can’t own you myself.  fucking hell.

I’d rather not belong to my Dad or my partner… So a woman’s family name isn’t important, but his is? If the core of love is ownership, I don’t want love.

Who knew there could be so much fail in one short paragraph? I don’t even know if I can unpack it all, but what really stuck out to me was, “We really don’t care how important your dad’s name or your family name is to you…” That says it all right there. I know that not everyone has the same relationship to their name as me, but to some people their name is pretty important. For me, I have a horrible relationship with my entire name; my first and middle because I’m trans* and my last because it reminds me of my dad and our strained relationship. I plan to change my entire name eventually and that’s a source of power and pride for me. Naming myself is fucking important to me. Once that happens I’m sure as hell not going to give it up for a man’s ego and linguistic insecurities. 

dailymurf:

petitesurrealiste:

strangerthanheartbreak:

Another reason to avoid marrying men.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

everything about this makes me sick.  yes, go marry your daddy, because clearly you still belong to him and I can’t own you myself.  fucking hell.

I’d rather not belong to my Dad or my partner… So a woman’s family name isn’t important, but his is? If the core of love is ownership, I don’t want love.

Who knew there could be so much fail in one short paragraph? I don’t even know if I can unpack it all, but what really stuck out to me was, “We really don’t care how important your dad’s name or your family name is to you…” That says it all right there. I know that not everyone has the same relationship to their name as me, but to some people their name is pretty important. For me, I have a horrible relationship with my entire name; my first and middle because I’m trans* and my last because it reminds me of my dad and our strained relationship. I plan to change my entire name eventually and that’s a source of power and pride for me. Naming myself is fucking important to me. Once that happens I’m sure as hell not going to give it up for a man’s ego and linguistic insecurities. 

(Source: marleymagaziner)

stfuconservatives:

bitchhofliving:

This literally made me sick.

The right to… not be grossed out by gay people? What right was stripped away? Seriously, somebody explain to me how a law that allows people to get married “strips away” rights from others.

Well, obviously the activist judges stripped Californians of their constitutional right to vote on and take away the human rights of others. That’s in there somewhere, right? Right?

stfuconservatives:

bitchhofliving:

This literally made me sick.

The right to… not be grossed out by gay people? What right was stripped away? Seriously, somebody explain to me how a law that allows people to get married “strips away” rights from others.

Well, obviously the activist judges stripped Californians of their constitutional right to vote on and take away the human rights of others. That’s in there somewhere, right? Right?

(Source: taylorareyouokay, via stfuconservatives)

Are You In The Know? [Teens Edition]

The term “teens” refers to 15–19-year-olds, unless otherwise specified.

[All of these statistics are cis-centric, unfortunately.]

Sexual Activity and Marriage Among Teens:

  • When American teens have sex for the first time, is it typically with a significant other or a more casual acquaintance? Seven in 10 female teens and more than five in 10 male teens report that their first sexual experience was with a steady partner, while 16% of females and 28% of males report a first sexual experience with someone whom they had just met or who was just a friend.[48]
  • What is known about the age at first sex among female teens in developing regions? In Latin America and the Caribbean, more than four in 10 sexually active female teens have had sex by their 18th birthday. In Sub-Saharan Africa, six in 10 female teens have had sex by that age.[49]
  • Are teen marriage rates similar throughout the developing world? No. The poorer the country or region in the developing world, the greater the chances are that female teens are married. [13,50] An estimated four in 10 women aged 15–19 living in low-income countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Central and Southeast Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean are married, compared with slightly more than one in 10 in upper-middle– and high-income countries in these regions.

Contraceptive Use Among Teens:

  • Do American teens typically use a contraceptive method the first time they have sex? How about the most recent time they had sex? The majority of U.S. teens use a contraceptive method the first time they have sex (78% of females and 85% of males).[48] Among teens who are already sexually active, more than eight in 10 female teens and nine in 10 male teens reported using a method the last time they had sex.
  • Which contraceptive method is most commonly used by American teens? The male condom is the most common contraceptive method used at first sex, as well as at most recent sex. Almost seven in 10 U.S. females and eight in 10 males used condoms the first time they had sex, and more than five in 10 female teens and almost eight in 10 male teens used it the last time they had sex.[48]
  • How do American teens’ sexual behaviors compare with those of European teens? Teens in the United States and Europe have similar levels of sexual activity. However, European teens are more likely to use contraceptives and to use more effective contraceptive methods; therefore, they have substantially lower pregnancy rates than U.S. teens.[51]
  • Do teens in developing regions have adequate access to contraceptives? No. Fewer than one-third of married female teens who want to avoid pregnancy use modern contraceptive methods. Among unmarried teens who want to avoid pregnancy, almost seven out of 10 in South Central and Southeast Asia and in Sub-Saharan Africa, and almost half in Latin America, do not use modern contraceptive methods.[13,50]
  • Do any U.S. states give minors confidential access to contraceptive services? Half of states explicitly allow minors to obtain contraceptive services without a parent’s involvement or interpret the absence of a law in favor of minors’ access.[52] The remaining states allow access to contraceptive services without parental involvement only for certain groups of minors, such as married teens.
  • What impact could U.S. parental involvement laws have on minors’ contraceptive use? While parental involvement can be helpful for some minors, others will remain sexually active but will not seek contraceptive services if they are required to tell their parents,[53] which puts them at increased risk for unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.
  • Do sexually active teens in the United States have a need for publicly funded contraceptive services? Some five million U.S. teens are in need of publicly funded contraceptive services and supplies. They represent about 30% of all U.S. women with such a need. Many sexually active teens need publicly funded contraceptive services so that they can obtain confidential care without having to depend on their family’s resources or their private insurance.[8]

Pregnancy and Births Among Teens:

  • What is the teen pregnancy rate in the United States? Overall, about 70 pregnancies occur for every 1,000 female teens. However, when only female teens who have ever had sex, the pregnancy rate is much higher, about 150 per 1,000.[54]
  • Is there a difference in teen pregnancy rates between older and younger teens in the United States? Yes. Two-thirds of all U.S. teen pregnancies occur among 18–19-year-olds. The pregnancy rate for younger teens is almost 40 per 1,000 women aged 15–17, while the rate for teens aged 18–19 is nearly 120 per 1,000 women.[54]
  • Does the teen pregnancy rate vary by race in the United States? Yes. The U.S. pregnancy rate for both black and Hispanic teens (126 and 127 per 1,000 women aged 15–19, respectively) is almost three times that of non-Hispanic white teens (44 per 1,000).[54]
  • Do teen fatherhood rates vary by race in the United States? Yes. The U.S. rate of fatherhood among black men aged 15–19 (34 per 1,000) is more than twice that among white men (15 per 1,000).[55]
  • What proportion of American teen pregnancies are unintended? Of the approximately 750,000 pregnancies that occur among teens every year, more than 80% are unintended.[54] Teens account for almost one-fifth of all unintended pregnancies.[26]  [Prolonged Eye Contact comment: one more reason to make emergency contraception available to younger teenagers over the counter without a prescription.]
  • Is the rate of unintended pregnancy among American teens higher or lower than that among older women? Calculations of the unintended pregnancy rate typically include all women, whether or not they are sexually active. While most older women are sexually active, many teens are not, so the rate among teens is often understated.[56] The unintended pregnancy rate among sexually active teens only is more than twice the rate among all women.
  • How many unintended pregnancies occur each year among teens in developing countries? Each year, there are more than six million unintended pregnancies among teens in South Central and Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean.[13]
  • What are the outcomes of U.S. teen pregnancies? The majority (nearly 60%) of U.S. teen pregnancies end in birth, while 27% end in abortion and the remainder end in miscarriage.[54]
  • Which countries have the most teen births? Worldwide, half of all teen births each year occur in just seven countries: Bangladesh, Brazil, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, India, Nigeria and the United States.[57]

Abortion Among Teens:

  • What proportion of all U.S. abortions occur among teens? Just 17% of all U.S. abortions are obtained by teenagers.[41] Teens aged 18–19 account for 11% of all abortions and 15–17-year-olds account for 6%; teens younger than age 15 account for another 0.4%. Teens aged 18–19 obtain two out of three teen abortions.
  • What is the abortion rate among American teens? There are 19 abortions for every 1,000 women aged 15–19 in the United States.[54] The abortion rate is higher than average for black and Hispanic teens (44 and 24 per 1,000 women aged 15–19, respectively) and lower than average for non-Hispanic whites (11 per 1,000).
  • What proportion of all unsafe abortions in the developing world occur among teens? Teens account for 14% of all unsafe abortions that occur in the developing world.[58] The number of teens in the developing world who have legal and safe abortions is unknown.[44]
  • Does obtaining an abortion have an impact on U.S. teens’ mental health? Studies of U.S. teens who have had an abortion show that this group is not at higher risk for depression or low self-esteem than teens who carry their pregnancy to term.[59]  Similarly, studies indicate a lack of negative mental health effect of abortion among adult women.
  • Do many states have laws requiring parental involvement in teens’ abortions? The majority of states have laws that require parents to consent to or be notified of a teen’s decision to have an abortion, but only a few require both parental notification and consent. A handful of states do not require any parental involvement. [60]
  • What is the effect of laws requiring parental involvement in teens’ abortions? Laws requiring parental involvement in minors’ abortions appear to do little to reduce teen abortion or pregnancy rates.[61] These laws do, however, force some teens to navigate complicated judicial bypass systems to obtain waivers, or to seek abortions in a state without such requirements. These barriers delay access to the procedure, reducing safety and resulting in later, more costly abortions.

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) Among Teens:

  • How does the incidence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among young people in the United States compare with that among older adults? Even though young people aged 15–24 represent only about 25% of sexually active Americans, they account for nearly half of all new STIs annually. Every year, roughly nine million new STIs occur among U.S. teens and young adults.[62] Rates among U.S. teens are much higher than rates among teens in Canada and Western Europe.[63]
  • Do many states give minors access to STI services without parental involvement? All 50 states and the District of Columbia give minors access to services related to sexually transmitted infections without parental involvement, although more than 10 states require that a minor be of a certain age (generally 12 or 14) to do so.[64]

Sources of Information About Sex:

  • Who do American teens trust the most for information on sex? American teens rank parents, peers and the media as important sources of sexual health information.[65]
  • Do U.S. states require that formal sex education curricula be medically accurate? Only a handful of states require that the information presented in sex education classes be medically accurate and factual (14 states, as of October 2011).[66]
  • What subjects are usually included in formal U.S. sex education curricula? Virtually all teens receive formal instruction about STIs, and more than eight in 10 receive instruction on abstinence. However, about one-third of teens do not receive any instruction about contraception.[67]
  • Do U.S. teens who receive abstinence education also receive information about birth control? Not always. About one in four teens (23% of females and 28% of males) receive abstinence education without receiving any formal instruction about birth control.[68]
  • Worldwide, do teens get comprehensive sex education in schools or other formal settings? Most often they do not. Teens in many parts of the world do not get comprehensive sex education. Many also report feeling shy about obtaining information and contraception from formal settings, particularly in countries where some influential groups believe that such education encourages sexual promiscuity.[69]
  • What impact does comprehensive sex education have on teen sexual behavior worldwide? Comprehensive sex education, which includes information on both contraception and abstinence, often results in delayed sexual activity, lower frequency of sex and fewer sexual partners.[49] This type of sex education can also increase condom or contraceptive use and reduce risky sexual behaviors.  Receiving comprehensive sex education does not lead teens to have sex earlier.
  • What impact does abstinence-only sex education have on teens? A review of 13 commonly used abstinence-only curricula found that 11 had incorrect, misleading or distorted information.[70] Some abstinence-only programs have been shown to deter contraceptive use among sexually active teens, increasing their risk of pregnancy and STIs.[67] Moreover, there is no strong evidence that abstinence-only programs influence teens to delay sexual activity, to have fewer sexual partners or, if already sexually active, to become abstinent.[71]

Are You In The Know? [Contraception Edition]

[All of these statistics are cis-centric, unfortunately.]

Sexual Activity:

  • How many women worldwide are in their childbearing years? There are nearly 1.6 billion women worldwide between the ages of 15 and 44.[1] In the United States alone, there are about 62 million.[2]
  • At what age do Americans have sex for the first time? On average, Americans have sex for the first time at age 17.[3,4]
  • At what age do most Americans get married? The median age at first marriage is 28 for men and 26 for women.[5]
  • How common is premarital sex in the United States? By age 44, 95% of Americans have had premarital sex.[6] The vast majority of Americans have sex before marriage—including those who abstained from sex during their teenage years—and this has been the case for decades. Even among women who were born in the 1940s, nearly nine in 10 had sex before marriage.

Contraceptive Use:

  • How many children do most women in the United States want? The typical American woman wants two children. This means that she’ll spend about five years pregnant, postpartum or trying to become pregnant, and roughly three decades—more than three-quarters of her reproductive life—trying to avoid pregnancy.[7]
  • How many women in the United States need contraceptives? More than half of U.S. women (nearly 36 million) are in need of contraceptive services because they are at risk for unintended pregnancy, meaning they are sexually active, are able to get pregnant and want to avoid pregnancy.[8]
  • Do most women in the United States use contraceptives? Virtually all women in the United States aged 15–44 who have ever had sex have used at least one contraceptive method (99%). Currently, only 7% of sexually active women who are at risk for unintended pregnancy are not using contraceptives.[8]
  • Does contraceptive use vary by race and ethnicity in the United States? Yes. Among U.S. women who could become pregnant, about 84% of non-Hispanic black women currently use a contraceptive method, compared with about 91% of non-Hispanic white and Hispanic women.[9]
  • Is contraceptive use common among religious women in the United States? Yes. Among sexually active U.S. women of all religious denominations who want to avoid pregnancy, almost seven in 10 use a highly effective method (i.e., sterilization, the pill or another hormonal method, or the IUD). For example, 98% of sexually experienced Catholic women have used a contraceptive method other than natural family planning. Use of contraception does not vary by attendance of religious services.[10]
  • How effective are contraceptives at preventing unintended pregnancy? When used correctly, contraceptives are highly effective. The two-thirds of U.S. women at risk of unintended pregnancy who use contraceptives consistently and correctly throughout the course of any given year account for only 5% of all unintended pregnancies.[11]
  • Is breast-feeding an effective form of contraception? Breast-feeding is considered an effective contraceptive method only for women who breast-feed exclusively (that is, they do not supplement with formula), and only for up to six months after giving birth or until menstruation resumes—whichever is shorter.[12]
  • How many women in the developing world want to avoid pregnancy but do not use modern contraceptives? In the developing world, one in four sexually active women who are at risk for unintended pregnancy—a total of 215 million women—do not use a modern contraceptive method. These women account for 82% of all unintended pregnancies in the developing world. Unintended pregnancy in these regions would decline by almost three-fourths if all women who wanted to avoid pregnancy were able to use modern contraceptives.[13]
  • How effective are different contraceptive methods at preventing pregnancy?

               

[This is a screenshot of a table outlining the failure rate of various contraceptive methods with “perfect use” and “typical use.” For those with visual impairments using screen readers the information is in text form at the link in the title of this post.]

  • Why do some women who use contraceptives still become pregnant? Consistent and correct use can be a challenge for women and couples. They often underestimate their risk of becoming pregnant, and life events such as a move, break-up or job change can disrupt contraceptive use. Additionally, women sometimes don’t have a method available at the time they have sex; others may not be able to obtain their preferred method in a timely manner, or at all. Even women who use their method perfectly can become pregnant, including a very small proportion who rely on highly effective hormonal methods (see table).[17]
  • What are the most common forms of contraception in the United States? Sterilization (male and female combined) is the most common contraceptive method, relied on by 37% of U.S. women. Sixty-three percent of women practicing contraception use nonpermanent modern methods, including hormonal methods (such as the pill, patch, implant, injectable and vaginal ring), the IUD and condoms.[9]
  • How common are modern contraceptive methods in developing regions, and which methods are relied on most? Three-quarters of women in developing countries (about 240 million women) who want to avoid pregnancy use a modern contraceptive method, including condoms. Method use varies substantially by region: Injectables and implants are the most common methods used in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia (making up 38% of contraceptive use in both regions), but in South Central Asia, sterilization is the most popular method, with nearly two-thirds of all contraceptive users relying on this method.[18]
  • How common is use of long-acting reversible contraceptive methods in the United States? While overall levels of use are low, reliance on IUDs and implants among women in the United States has increased significantly in the past decade. As of 2006-2008, more than 5% of U.S. women rely on the IUD—a substantial increase from 1995, when fewer than 1% used this method. Because IUDs and implants are highly effective and less prone than other methods to user error, rates of unintended pregnancy could substantially decrease if more women relied on them.[19]
  • How has the recent recession impacted women’s desired family size and contraceptive use in the United States? In 2009, nearly half of U.S. women aged 18–34 said that as a result of the recession, they wanted to delay pregnancy or limit the number of children they had. But for many women, economic hardship meant having to skimp on their contraceptive use—for example, by skipping pills, shifting to a less expensive method or not using birth control at all—in order to save money.[20]

Public Funding For Contraceptive Services:

  • What are the supporting sources of publicly funded contraceptive services? The Title X national family planning program and Medicaid, the joint federal-state health insurance program for low-income Americans, form the core of support for family planning services. Medicaid is the primary source of financial support and accounts for more than 70% of the funding. Title X accounts for 12% of funding for publicly funded contraceptive services in part by meeting clinics’ ongoing infrastructure needs in ways that Medicaid cannot.[11]
  • How many U.S. women need publicly funded contraceptive services? More than 17 million women aged 13–44 are considered to be in need because they are at risk for unintended pregnancy and have incomes below 250% of the federal poverty level, or because they are younger than 20 years old and are assumed to have a low personal income.[8]
  • What impact do publicly funded family planning services have in the United States? Publicly funded family planning services reach more than nine million women each year, helping to avert about two million unintended pregnancies (including 400,000 teen pregnancies) that would have resulted in about 860,000 unplanned births, 810,000 abortions and 270,000 miscarriages. Without these services, the number of unintended pregnancies and abortions occurring in the United States would be nearly two-thirds higher among women overall and among teens; the number of unintended pregnancies among poor women would nearly double.[11]
  • How many publicly funded family planning clinics exist in the United States? What about Title X-funded clinics? There are more than 8,000 publicly funded family planning clinics nationwide, and about half are supported in part by the federal Title X program.[11]
  • What would be the impact of fully meeting the developing world’s need for family planning and maternal and newborn health services? The lives of more than 1.5 million newborns and 250,000 women in the developing world would be saved each year. More than 50 million fewer women would experience unintended pregnancies, lowering the cost of providing maternal and newborn health services. Thus, fully funding both of these services simultaneously actually lowers net costs.[21]
  • Are there any cost savings from providing publicly funded family planning services in the United States? Since more than nine in 10 women receiving these services would be eligible for Medicaid-funded care if they became pregnant, avoiding the significant costs associated with these unintended births saves taxpayers $4 for every $1 spent on family planning.[11]
Emergency Contraception:
  • What is emergency contraception? Emergency contraception, sometimes called the “morning-after pill,” consists of a concentrated dosage of one or more of the same hormones found in ordinary birth control pills. It is not an abortifacient and has no effect on an established pregnancy. Emergency contraception is recommended as a back-up method for women who have experienced contraceptive failure (e.g., if the condom broke) or had unprotected sex, and can be effective for up to three to five days after sex, depending on the specific product (see answer below). Intrauterine devices (IUDs) can also act as a method of emergency contraception if inserted shortly after unprotected sex.[22]
  • For how long is emergency contraception considered effective at preventing pregnancy, and do women and men need a prescription for it? As of October 2011, there were four FDA-approved emergency contraception products on the market. Three of these products are approved for preventing pregnancy when taken within 72 hours after unprotected sex; the other (Ella) for up to five days. Individuals younger than 17 generally need a prescription, while older women and men do not. However, Ella is only available by prescription.[22]
  • How often is emergency contraception used in the United States? About one in 10 women in the U.S. aged 15–44 has ever used emergency contraception, which is about twice the proportion who used it in 2002. Additionally, American women aged 18–29, the age-group at greatest risk for unintended pregnancy, are more likely than other women to have used this back-up method.[23]

On behalf of all gays and lesbians living in Minnesota, I would like to wholeheartedly apologize for our community’s successful efforts to threaten your traditional marriage. We are ashamed of ourselves for causing you to have what the media refers to as an “illicit affair” with your staffer, and we also extend our deepest apologies to him and to his wife. These recent events have made it quite clear that our gay and lesbian tactics have gone too far, affecting even the most respectful of our society.

Minnesota gay people apologize for ruining adulterous Senator’s marriage

oh my god this letter is amazing! another excellent paragraph:

“Forgive us.  As you know, we are not church-going people, so we are unable to fully appreciate that “gay marriage” is incompatible with Christian values, despite the fact that those values carry a biblical tradition of adultery such as yours.  We applaud you for keeping that tradition going.”

(via tooyoungforthelivingdead)

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

Natural Family Planning and Marriage Covenant

liberal-antics:

doubtingansley:

When man and woman marry, they pledge that they will exercise faithful love toward each other for better and for worse until death separates them. When they engage in the natural marriage act, at least implicitly they are saying with their bodies, “We love each other and we take each other again for better and for worse. We are renewing our marriage covenant.”

On the other hand, when a couple uses a contraceptive drug, device or behavior, their body language says, “We take each other for better but definitely not for the imagined worse of possible pregnancy.”

-Natural Family Planning Manual

Because it’s so hard to believe that two married people simply don’t want kids. Maybe they can’t afford them. Maybe it’s dangerous for the person who could get pregnant to have them. Use of contraception is a personal choice. People don’t get married only to have children. They get married because they love each other. Not wanting children does not diminish that. If anything, they’re family planning smartly by waiting for the right time for them to conceive. 

(via masenko-your-face-deactivated20)

Feminist marriage is a three-way contract between two women and government. Most women will have children, and few women can afford or will go to the extreme of using artificial insemination to achieve pregnancy. Government is the automatic third party collecting “child support” entitlements for children born in these marriages.

Children will be born of extramarital affairs backed by welfare guarantees and child support entitlements. Feminist marriages are automatically entitled with many tax-free, governmental income sources for having children.

Feminist marriage is a marriage between any two women and the welfare state. It constitutes a powerful feminist takeover of marriage by government, and places the NOW in the position of dictating government policy as a matter of “feminist Constitutional rights.”

Feminist marriage will be far more attractive to women than heterosexual marriage. Sexual orientation does not matter when two women marry and become “married room-mates.” They can still have as many boyfriends as they want and capture the richest ones for baby-daddies by “forgetting” to use their invisible forms of birth control. On average, a feminist marriage will have at least four income sources, two of them tax-free, plus backup welfare entitlements.

Feminist marriage is government-sponsored serial polyandry, uniquely enriched by one or more substantial income sources not available to the other two planned subordinate classes of marriage.

The Center for Marriage Policy : Why Same-sex marriage is unconstitutional

I don’t think I ever got this memo, you guys. I can’t believe you would plan something like this without telling me.

(via greaterthanlapsed)

This totes sounds like a plan, we should totally form a feminist marriage guise, so we can have ALL THE LESBIAN SEX!!!

(via private-revolution)

Why was I not informed of this when I picked up my feminist membership card at teh lezbian seks store?! And, quite frankly, who wants legal polyandry?

(via private-revolution)

indigocrayon:

missatralissa:

The majority of abortions are due to Fornication.



Couldn’t help myself, I found that little gem while scrolling the abortion tag. That little nugget of stupidity just made my night. 

Well, actually, fornication is sex outside of marriage. And that sentence is not true because the majority of abortions are not due to fornication, because “Women who have never married and are not cohabiting account for 45% of all abortions,” according to the Guttmacher Institute (http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/fb_induced_abortion.html).

Actually, that statistic from Guttmacher isn’t saying quite what you think it’s saying. It’s true that 45% of people obtaining abortions have never been married and were not cohabiting at the time of their abortion, but that doesn’t mean that 55% of people getting abortions were therefore married. It means the remaining 55% of people are married, have been married previously (though not necessarily currently), or were cohabiting but not married. At the Guttmacher link they cite this study: Jones RK, Finer LB and Singh S, Characteristics of U.S. Abortion Patients, 2008, New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2010.
From the study [should be pregnant people]: 

Union Status: 
Women’s desires to have children, as well as their ability to negotiate the responsibilities of childrearing, may be influenced by relationships with male partners, and abortion varies substantially by union status. Nearly one-half of women having abortions were living with male partners: Some 15% were married, and an additional 29% had been unmarried but cohabiting with male partners in the month they became pregnant. Fifty-six percent of women had not been living with their partners, and most of these (45% of all women who had abortions) had never been married. Abortion patients were slightly (but significantly) less likely to be married in 2008 than in 2000; however, this drop can be attributed to a decline between survey years in currently married women as a proportion of the general population of women aged 15–44 (from 48% to 44%). The proportion of abortion patients who were cohabiting was significantly higher in 2008 than in 2000. Over the last few decades, cohabitation has become a more common living arrangement, and the change among abortion patients may simply reflect this trend; unfortunately, we lack comparable information about this living arrangement among all women in 2000.
Married women were underrepresented among those who had abortions; their likelihood of having an abortion was one-third that of all women (abortion index, 0.34). Both never-married and previously married women were overrepresented among abortion patients and had relative abortion rates slightly above the national average (1.13 and 1.33, respectively). Cohabiting women were substantially overrepresented among women who had abortions; their relative abortion rate was more than three times that of all women (3.46). 
While most women accessing abortion services were unmarried and not cohabiting, many were in relationships at the time of their abortion. Sixty-two percent had been in a relationship with their male partner a year or longer, and only 12% reported that they had not been in a relationship with the man who had gotten them pregnant (Figure 1, page 7). Even among never-married women, almost one half reported that they had been in a relationship with their male partner for a year or more.
[emphasis mine]

Here’s a portion of the study’s result chart:

indigocrayon:

missatralissa:

The majority of abortions are due to Fornication.

Couldn’t help myself, I found that little gem while scrolling the abortion tag. That little nugget of stupidity just made my night. 

Well, actually, fornication is sex outside of marriage. And that sentence is not true because the majority of abortions are not due to fornication, because “Women who have never married and are not cohabiting account for 45% of all abortions,” according to the Guttmacher Institute (http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/fb_induced_abortion.html).

Actually, that statistic from Guttmacher isn’t saying quite what you think it’s saying. It’s true that 45% of people obtaining abortions have never been married and were not cohabiting at the time of their abortion, but that doesn’t mean that 55% of people getting abortions were therefore married. It means the remaining 55% of people are married, have been married previously (though not necessarily currently), or were cohabiting but not married. At the Guttmacher link they cite this study: Jones RK, Finer LB and Singh S, Characteristics of U.S. Abortion Patients, 2008, New York: Guttmacher Institute, 2010.

From the study [should be pregnant people]: 

Union Status: 

Women’s desires to have children, as well as their ability to negotiate the responsibilities of childrearing, may be influenced by relationships with male partners, and abortion varies substantially by union status. Nearly one-half of women having abortions were living with male partners: Some 15% were married, and an additional 29% had been unmarried but cohabiting with male partners in the month they became pregnant. Fifty-six percent of women had not been living with their partners, and most of these (45% of all women who had abortions) had never been married. Abortion patients were slightly (but significantly) less likely to be married in 2008 than in 2000; however, this drop can be attributed to a decline between survey years in currently married women as a proportion of the general population of women aged 15–44 (from 48% to 44%). The proportion of abortion patients who were cohabiting was significantly higher in 2008 than in 2000. Over the last few decades, cohabitation has become a more common living arrangement, and the change among abortion patients may simply reflect this trend; unfortunately, we lack comparable information about this living arrangement among all women in 2000.

Married women were underrepresented among those who had abortions; their likelihood of having an abortion was one-third that of all women (abortion index, 0.34). Both never-married and previously married women were overrepresented among abortion patients and had relative abortion rates slightly above the national average (1.13 and 1.33, respectively). Cohabiting women were substantially overrepresented among women who had abortions; their relative abortion rate was more than three times that of all women (3.46). 

While most women accessing abortion services were unmarried and not cohabiting, many were in relationships at the time of their abortion. Sixty-two percent had been in a relationship with their male partner a year or longer, and only 12% reported that they had not been in a relationship with the man who had gotten them pregnant (Figure 1, page 7). Even among never-married women, almost one half reported that they had been in a relationship with their male partner for a year or more.

[emphasis mine]

Here’s a portion of the study’s result chart:


(Source: missapea)

Afghanistan: New survey shows significant improvement in maternal and child health - challenges remain

Kabul, Afghanistan
Many more Afghan women are receiving skilled care today during pregnancy and delivery than a decade ago, and more women and children are surviving today than ever before as a result of greater access to health facilities and better care according to the Afghanistan Mortality Survey (AMS) 2010. Despite the challenging situation implementing this survey, the AMS 2010, released today, represents some 87 percent of the population and provides needed data on the current state of healthcare in Afghanistan, confirming the remarkable achievements made in the health sector over the past decade.

"The AMS 2010 is the most comprehensive national survey carried out in Afghanistan to assess mortality levels and their causes to date," said Dr. Suraya Dalil, Acting Minister of Public Health.

According to the AMS 2010, 60 percent of Afghan women are now receiving antenatal care from a skilled provider and over one-third are giving birth with assistance from a skilled birth attendant. The AMS 2010 also confirms that investments in infrastructure, education and health in the past decade have paid off. According to the AMS, fewer women are dying from pregnancy-related causes than they did seven years ago, and adult mortality has also declined.

Despite the many positive trends, the survey still documents substantial gaps. For example, two in three births still take place at home. Likewise, lack of money and distance to health care facilities remain major barriers to accessing health care.

"Pregnancy-related conditions remain a frequent cause of death among Afghan women," said Dr. Dalil." About one in 50 Afghan women will die of pregnancy-related causes. Throughout Afghanistan, one woman dies about every two hours from pregnancy-related causes."

Dr. Dalil added, “About one in thirteen children will die before their first birthday and about one in ten children die before age 5, mostly from acute respiratory infection and other preventable causes.”

The survey also shows positive changes in marriage practices and knowledge about contraception. According to the AMS 2010, Afghan women have just over five children on average. Although marriage occurs at relatively young ages, there is evidence from the AMS 2010 that age at marriage, particularly for females, is rising.

In addition to providing comprehensive information on health, the AMS documented improvements in access to clean water, sanitation, and electricity. More than half of all households now have access to improved sources of drinking water, though only one in five has improved sanitation facilities that are not shared with other households. Only about 40 percent of households have access to electricity.

While great strides have been made in the healthcare sector, there is still work to be done. “We must continue our efforts through government programs the work of NGOs, and our partnership with donors to bring quality health care to every family in Afghanistan,” Dr. Dalil said.

The AMS 2010 gathered information about 22,351 households, 47,848 women and 3,157 deaths in the three years before the survey. The survey was implemented by the Afghan Public Health Institute (APHI) and the Central Statistics Organization (CSO) with technical assistance from ICF Macro, a U.S.-based research organization, the Indian Institute for Health Management Research (IIHMR), and the World Health Organization (WHO). Funding was provided by the United States Agency for International Development and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA.)

The Ministry of Health would like to express its deep appreciation to the thousands of community health workers, midwives, nurses, pharmacists, lab technicians, physicians and health care managers for all their efforts, under difficult circumstances, to improve health care in Afghanistan. The Ministry also expresses gratitude to the NGOs, professional health associations, the private sector and the international community, and most important of all, to the people of Afghanistan who have contributed to these achievements. 

[Emphasis mine. Also to put that maternal mortality statistic in context: while 1 in 50 Afghans die from pregnancy complications, only 24 in 100,000 pregnant people die in the US from pregnancy. Many countries in Europe get below 10 per 100,000. Al-Jazeera also did a write-up on the report.]

Reproductive Rights Are Human Rights

So, I’ve actually heard people say that not only is abortion not a human right but that reproductive rights themselves don’t exist. That it’s just “feminist rhetoric” made up by feminists. 

No, I’m not even kidding. 

Due to the UN’s special report talking about how making abortion illegal is a human rights violation, and the antichoice backlash this is causing, I wanted to compile a list of human rights treaties and other documents that can be (and are) used to make the case that reproductive rights are human rights. I think it’s also important to remember one thing: these documents are often short and broad, not extensive and covering every minute right that every human on earth could possibly think of. They are much like the (US) Constitution in the respect that they have broad categories in which derivative rights can be attributed to: essentially, just because a right isn’t explicitly named doesn’t mean it can’t be upheld with a particular document, nor does it mean that it “doesn’t exist.”

[These documents are all, unfortunately, cis-centric and binarist.]

A great place to start is the legal scholarship done by the Center for Reproductive Rights. They participate in several legal battles each year and often use human rights treaties to argue their cases from a legal standpoint. They’ve compiled a few documents that outline how various treaties uphold reproductive rights as human rights.

First is their pdf Twelve Human Rights Key to Reproductive Rights. From the pdf:

All individuals have reproductive rights, which are grounded in a constellation of fundamental human rights guarantees. These guarantees are found in the oldest and most accepted human rights instruments, as well as in more recently adopted international and regional treaties.  A series of documents adopted at United Nations conferences, most notably the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), have explicitly linked governments’ duties under international treaties to their obligations to uphold reproductive rights.    

As stated in Paragraph 7.3 of the ICPD Programme of Action: 

"[R]eproductive rights embrace certain human rights that are already recognized in national laws, international human rights documents and other consensus documents.  These rights rest on the recognition of the basic right of all couples and individuals to decide freely and responsibly the number, spacing and timing of their children and to have the information and means to do so, and the right to attain the highest standard of sexual and reproductive health.  It also includes their right to make decisions concerning reproduction free of discrimination, coercion and violence, as expressed in human rights documents."

These legal principles have been given added force and depth in a series of interpretations made by UN and regional human rights bodies in groundbreaking cases. In addition, the UN treaty monitoring bodies, which are charged with monitoring government compliance with major human rights treaties, now routinely recommend that governments take action to ensure sexual and reproductive rights for women.  

Building upon these developments are two new instruments that explicitly recognize women’s reproductive rights. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (Disability Rights Convention) is the first comprehensive international human rights instrument to specifically identify the right to reproductive and sexual health as a human right. At the regional level, the Protocol to the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights on the Rights of Women in Africa (Protocol on the Rights of Women in Africa) expressly articulates women’s reproductive rights as human rights, and explicitly guarantees a woman’s right to control her fertility.  It also provides a detailed guarantee of women’s right to reproductive health and family planning services. The protocol affirms women’s right to reproductive choice and autonomy, and clarifies African states’ duties in relation to women’s sexual and reproductive health.   

In this document they outline twelve human rights which are important to upholding reproductive rights. These are: 

  • The Right to Life
  • The Right to Liberty and Security of Person
  • The Right to Health, including Sexual and Reproductive Health  
  • The Right to Decide the Number and Spacing of Children 
  • The Right to Consent to Marriage and to Equality in Marriage  
  • The Right to Privacy 
  • The Right to Equality and Non-Discrimination 
  • The Right to be Free from  Practices that Harm Women and Girls 
  • The Right to Not be Subjected to Torture or Other Cruel, Inhuman, or Degrading Treatment or Punishment 
  • The Right to be Free from Sexual and Gender-Based Violence 
  • The Right to Access Sexual and Reproductive Health Education and Family Planning Information 
  • The Right to Enjoy Scientific Progress

They then go on to examine a multitude of international and regional human rights treaties and the specific articles in each document which relate to each of the twelve key rights. They examine:

International Treaties and Conventions

Regional Treaties and Conventions 

International Conference Documents 

Read More

In Case You’ve Missed It: The Week of November 7, 2011 

nicole-clark:

From sexual health, mental wellness, relationships, and everything in between, these are some of the news highlights that have happened this week:

Thank you Mississippi! Voters rejected Amendment 26 (aka Personhood Amendment) that would have defined life as starting at conception, and outlawed abortion and many forms of birth control if passed. Here’s why it failed to pass and what its failure really means for women’s reproductive health nationally. (*Hint: This ain’t the last of the Personhood movement*)

Why personhood, and not pregnancy prevention?

Join the #WomenAreWatching political action campaign and let the 2012 candidates know you you’ll be watching their every move *cues Every Breath Your Take by The Police*

Heather Corinna of Scarleteen gives advice to a reader’s question: What if no one saves sex for marriage like I am?

Harassment, male privilege, and jokes that women just don’t get.

Patriarchy eats its women and children and criminally cripples its men.

Was President Obama right is requiring health insurance companies to cover birth control without co-pays? You betcha!

Read More

(Source: nicoleclarkconsulting)

theowlintheolivetree:

petejesuschrist:

queefnasty:

if you are gay, and you are atheist, why do you want to get married?

marraige is technically a “holy union” and if you don’t believe in that shit why do it?

free logical thinking my ass

cause it’s traditional. Two people can celebrate being together whilst avoiding all of that lousy religious junk

 There is so much more to marriage than just going to a church and saying a few nice words, it solidifies the relationship in some people’s eyes. Marriage is about love, not gender or religion and everyone should have the ability to marry the one person that they truly love regardless of what they do or do not believe. 

First, the definition of “marriage” has changed dramatically over the course of time and different cultures, even within your own bible. Second, there is a difference between religious marriage and civil marriage. Religious marriage is legally unenforceable, and means nothing in the eyes of the government. Due to the separation of church and state, the government can not and will not impose rules on what marriages a religious institution endorses. They’ve said that repeatedly, as well as during the senate committee hearing on the repeal of DOMA. Civil marriage is all that really matters as it gives people over 1000 federal benefits not afforded to unmarried people. Civil marriage is what enables all atheists (gay or straight) to get married, in city halls no less! Gay people are fighting for the latter, obviously. It would be nice if their churches would accept them (and many do), but that’s not what the mainstream political battle for gay marriage is about. The point is, denying civil marriage to anyone is unconstitutional. Talk about the sanctity or holiness of marriage all you want, but it has nothing to do with civil marriage or the privileges heterosexual people take for granted that are being denied to gay people, which has a profoundly negative effect on their lives.

(Source: queefdollaz, via theowlintheolivetree-deactivate)

kittensfoodandfeminism:

“and if he says, ‘i will not come back to you,’ fine. i’ll find a different man. this is my life. … i don’t care if i marry you. i don’t care if i marry another man. i care if i do something that’s special.”

i hope that, twenty years from now, this girl is the same unstoppable badass she is today.

(Source: youtube.com)

CUDDLE FUDDLE by DEDDY